MERCHANDISE

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ADD SOME SWIFT STYLE TO YOUR LIFE

Whether it's to learn new Swift tips every month of the year or perhaps just the need for some comic relief, Hacking with Swift has some exclusive merchandise that make the perfect gift for someone special – or just to treat yourself.

Ships to USA, Canada, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, and Brazil


Learn

The Improve Your Swift Month by Month calendar gives you 12 months of Swift tips about functional programming, closures, POP, and more.

Laugh

The Calendar for Exasperated Swift Developers gives you 12 months of Swift snark so that you feel less alone next time Xcode crashes.

Love

All products are printed by an on-demand print provider, so you're guaranteed beautiful, long-lasting products that will look great for years.

SWIFT MONTH BY MONTH


Take your Swift to the next level with 12 months of tips. Each month picks a topic such as closures, functional programming, or extensions, and gives you hands-on code examples you can try for yourself.

Improve your Swift Month by Month is the easiest way to learn Swift you'll ever find – just hang the calendar next to your desk and learn something new each time you walk by.

Some of Swift's concepts can be hard to master, so why not try something new? This calendar delivers 12 months of varied tips and techniques for Swift, iOS, and Xcode, all designed to help you write better apps.

Price quoted is for the large calendar; other sizes are available at lower price.
Includes customizable holidays and flexible start dates.

THE CALENDAR FOR EXASPERATED SWIFT DEVELOPERS


As much as we love Swift, iOS, and Xcode, sometimes it can be frustrating when we hit problems with our tools. If you'd like to lighten the mood with a little Swift snark, we have just the calendar for you…

The Calendar for Exasperated Swift Developers adds a little snark to your Swift, borne out of years of fighting with Interface Builder, filing bugs in the black hole that is Radar, and wondering why LLDB still doesn't work.

If you've ever found yourself questioning your sanity after a hard day of Core Data, crying yourself to sleep because Auto Layout seems designed to make your brain bleed, or nursing a strong drink because your Swift project takes 20 minutes to compile, you can hang this calendar on your wall as a reminder that you're not alone.

Price quoted is for the large calendar; other sizes are available at lower price.
Includes customizable holidays and flexible start dates.

CLOTHING


Love Hacking with Swift so much you want to tell the world all about it? You'll be pleased to hear I have just the thing for you: exclusive Hoodie of Truth™ replicas can be yours to own today, in both white and black!

The Hoodie of Truth™ was first worn by me during my talk How Not to Write Swift, delivered at Swift & Fika 2018. It gives its wearer magical* powers to speak the truth about Swift development, but with great power comes great responsibility: make sure you treat your colleagues with kindness and compassion, and work together to find agreement.

* Note: your Hoodie of Truth™ replica may not have actual magical powers.

BUG FIXES AND PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENTS


When it comes time to tell the world what's changed in the latest version of your app, you could go into great detail about new features, new user interface enhancements, new levels in your game, and more…

…or you could be lazy and write the seven words that are the fall back for lazy developers across the world:

“Contains minor bug fixes and performance improvements”

Well, thanks to the wonders of the print on-demand marketplace, you can now have those words printed on your very own coffee mug. You can choose between 11oz and 15oz (approx 300ml and 420ml), but the words are always the same, because – let's face it – if some of the biggest apps on the App Store can't be bothered to write something original why should you?

(Tasty-looking donut not included.)

Price quoted is for the 11oz mug; other sizes and varieties are available at different prices.

POSTER PRINTS


If you're sick of staring at the walls of your cubicle, it's time to brighten them up with a splash of programmer humor. Two of the pages from the Calendar for Exasperated Swift Developers are available separately as 14"x11" prints (approx 35x28cm), so you'll always be able to remember that Xcode hates everyone else just as much as it hates you.

All prices quoted are for a 14"x11" print (approx 35x28cm)
Other sizes and varieties are available at different prices.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


Q. Who sells these things?

A: All products are produced, sold, and shipped through Zazzle and Teespring.

Q. How can be I sure the products are good quality?

A: Both Zazzle and Teespring have very friendly returns and refunds policies – if you aren't happy with your order, get in touch and they'll help make it right!

Q. How can I pay?

A: Zazzle and Teespring handle all payment, and support Visa, Mastercard, American Express, and PayPal.

Q. Do you ship to my country?

A: All shipping is handled by Zazzle and Teespring. To the best of my knowledge, they ship to the US, Canada, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, and Brazil.

Q. How come the price varies?

A: Zazzle and Teespring calculate currencies and taxes based on your locality, and also apply shipping fees.

Q. How come you made a calendar for people who hate Xcode / Swift?

A: The Calendar for Exasperated Swift Developers is some light-hearted humor. We all work with Xcode, iOS, and Swift every day, and we know how hard Apple's developers work to make those the best they can be. At the same time, nothing is perfect, and it's nice to be able to poke fun now and then – we hope Apple's developers can appreciate this is nothing more than a little light-hearted fun.

CREDITS


Swift Month by Month

January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December.

The Calendar for Exasperated Swift Developers

January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December.

I'm grateful to Craig Clayton, Janie Clayton, Stephen DeStefano, Dan Leivers, Chris Rivers, and Simon Wolf for their invaluable feedback.