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Wrap up

That was easy, right? And yet it's such a great feature to have, because now your app can talk to users even when it isn't running. You want to show a step count for how far they've walked? Use a notification. You want to trigger an alert because it's their turn to play in a game? Use a notification. You want to send them marketing messages to make them buy more stuff? Actually, just don't do that, you bad person.

We’ve only scratched the surface of what notifications can do, but if you’d like to explore more advanced topics – such as attaching pictures or letting the user type responses rather than tapping buttons – see my book Practical iOS 10.

We’ll be coming back to notifications again in project 33, where CloudKit is used to create and deliver remote notifications when server data has changed.

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About the author

Paul Hudson is the creator of Hacking with Swift, the most comprehensive series of Swift books in the world. He's also the editor of Swift Developer News, the maintainer of the Swift Knowledge Base, and Mario Kart world champion. OK, so that last part isn't true. If you're curious you can learn more here.

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